6287 S. Redwood Rd #101

Taylorsville, UT

Phone Number

(801) 261-9155

Sleep Apnea

We excel at helping CPAP intolerant sufferers of sleep apnea. Call to find out how we can help you. 

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What is Sleep Apnea?

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the term for when the airway collapses, either partially or fully, while someone is asleep. This limits or blocks the ability for air to flow into the lungs. As the person continues to try and breathe, the airway constricts, no matter how hard they try to keep breathing. Once this happens, the person will change the position of their tongue and jaw so that the airway is now open. This usually is followed by the person gasping or snorting. Finally, the person affected will begin this process again.

The effects of this are harmful. It not only makes it harder to breathe, which can be dangerous, but it also leads to less restful sleep. When the airways constrict, the brain “awakens” the person so that they are sleeping more lightly. Spurts of gasping and snorting can repeat hundreds of times throughout the night, disrupting sleep all around.

DID YOU KNOW?

25% of men in the U.S. are estimated to suffer from some form of Sleep Apnea

AND

Sleep Apnea is linked to obesity, diabetes, stroke and heart failure

The Stages of Sleep

For those who suffer from this condition, it is near impossible to go through the full cycle of a restful sleep. There are four stages of sleep, and each one is necessary to achieve a full night’s rest.

The four stages of the sleep cycle are:

  1. Transition – about 5% of the total cycle.
  2. Light – about 45% of the cycle.
  3. Deep – about 25% of the cycle. This is when the body heals itself and many important reparative functions occur. People who don’t enter the deep cycle will be tired the next day.
  4. REM – Rapid Eye Movement – about 25% of the cycle. This is when most memorable dreams occur. People who don’t complete a full REM cycle tend to complain that they are tired and find it difficult to concentrate.

The Stages of Sleep

For those who suffer from this condition, it is near impossible to go through the full cycle of a restful sleep. There are four stages of sleep, and each one is necessary to achieve a full night’s rest.

The four stages of the sleep cycle are:

  1. Transition – about 5% of the total cycle.
  2. Light – about 45% of the cycle.
  3. Deep – about 25% of the cycle. This is when the body heals itself and many important reparative functions occur. People who don’t enter the deep cycle will be tired the next day.
  4. REM – Rapid Eye Movement – about 25% of the cycle. This is when most memorable dreams occur. People who don’t complete a full REM cycle tend to complain that they are tired and find it difficult to concentrate.

How is Sleep Apnea Treated?

Your quality of life can be affected greatly by the quality of the sleep you get. Fortunately, help for those suffering with a lack of sleep is easily accessible from a sleep clinic. You can usually get treatment without the need for medications.

CPAP Machine Therapy

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. A CPAP machine blows a constant stream of air into your mouth, forcing open your airway and allowing your body to get the oxygen it needs. Despite its widespread use, many people are CPAP intolerant and are unable to wear the mask at night due to how invasive and uncomfortable it can be.

Oral Appliances

A mandibular advancement device is one such oral appliance used in the treatment of sleep apnea. They are worn in the mouth overnight and look like sports mouth guards. Their purpose is to ease the lower jaw forwards with the use of metal hinges to make breathing easier.

Another is a tongue retaining device, which acts as a kind of splint to keep the tongue in place and open the airways.

Surgery

Rarely is surgery used to treat OSA. But if needed, nasal surgery may help a patient’s ability to use a CPAP. There is also the option of having a bimaxillary advancement performed. When all else fails, the last option is having a Tracheostomy performed – when a surgeon makes an opening in the front of the neck and inserts a tube into the windpipe to help patients breathe.

Stop suffering from poor sleep. Find out how we can help.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will my insurance cover treatment?

Insurance coverage varies between plans and providers. The easiest way to find out if your insurance policy will cover the appliance is to look at your list of benefits and requirements. We are contracted with most medical insurance providers including Medicare, Medicaid and Tricare, so we can help you determine if your visit will be covered. In the vast majority of cases, where there is a medical need for treatment, insurance will cover at least part of the treatment.

*Note that most insurance companies consider the treatment of snoring as a “cosmetic” issue, and therefore won’t cover the cost of treatment.

Will treatment require surgery?

Here at the Center for Sleep Apnea and TMJ, we focus on finding a non-surgical solution first. In fact, we specialize in non-surgical treatments. Surgery is only considered as a last resort when all other avenues of treatment have been explored.

 

Will I have to take medication?

Most of the treatments do not require the use of medications. In some cases, medication may be prescribed to help alleviate some of the pain caused by TMJ.

Will I have to be connected to a machine while I sleep?

We specialize in solutions for people that are CPAP intolerant or can't use a CPAP machine.

The best treatment for sleep apnea is the use of a CPAP machine. But in cases where that hasn’t been successful, we prescribe oral appliances that are worn at night.

Oral appliance therapy is a widely used and accepted method for treating sleep disordered breathing.

Call us for a consultation.

Contact Us

(801) 261-9155

info@sleepandtmjutah.com

Office

6287 S Redwood Rd #101

Taylorsville, UT 84123